Friday Khutbah (09 Sept 2011): The real friendship – The six rights of every Muslim

The real and true friendship in an Islamic prospective and point of view.

Tafseer of the Hadeeth of Six Rights of every Muslim

Ash-Shaikh ‘Abdur-Rahmaan As-Sa’dee’s explanation of the hadeeth regarding the Muslim’s rights Abu Hurayrah (radhiyallaahu ‘anhu) narrated that the Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said, “The rights of the Muslim upon the Muslim are six.” It was said, “And what are they Oh Messenger of Allaah?” He replied, “When you meet him, give him the greeting of peace, when he invites you, respond to his invitation, when he seeks your advice, advise him, when he sneezes and praises Allaah, supplicate for mercy upon him, when he becomes ills, visit him, and when he dies follow him (i.e. his funeral).”

This hadeeth was reported by Muslim.These six rights, whoever establishes them in dealing with the Muslims, then his establishing things other than them (from the obligations) are even more important (or necessary). And his doing these things results in him fulfilling these obligations and rights, which contain an abundance of good and tremendous reward from Allaah.

The First Right:
“When you meet him, give him the greeting of peace.” For verily the greeting of peace is a cause of love, which results in producing faith (Al-Eemaan), which results in the person entering the Paradise. This is as Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said, “By the o­ne in Whose Hand is my soul, you all will not enter into the Paradise until you believe, and you will not believe until you love each other. Shall I not direct you to something that if you do it, you will love each other? Spread the greeting of peace amongst yourselves.”

The greeting of peace is from the virtuous characteristics of Islaam. For verily each of the two people who meet each other supplicates for the other for safety from evils, and mercy, and blessing that brings about every good. And what follows this is a cheerful face and appropriate words of greeting which result in unity and love, and it removes feelings of estrangement and cold disassociation. Thus, giving the greeting of peace is the right of the Muslim, and it is obligatory upon the person who is greeted to return greeting with a similar greeting or o­ne that is better than it. And the best of the people are those who start the greeting of peace first.

The Second Right:
“When he invites you, respond to his invitation.” This means that when he invites you with an invitation to some food and drink, then fulfill the request of your brother who has drawn near to you and honored you with the invitation. Respond to his invitation (i.e. accept it), unless you have an excuse.

The Third Right:
His statement, “And when he seeks your advice, advise him.” This means that if he seeks consultation with you regarding some action, as to whether he should do it or not, then advise him with that which you would like for yourself. Thus, if the action is something that is beneficial in all aspects, then encourage him to do that, and if it is something harmful, then warn him against it. And if the action contains both benefit and harm, then explain that to him and weigh the benefits against the harms. Likewise, if he consults with you concerning some dealing with someone among the people, or whether he should marry a woman off to someone, or whether he should marry someone, then extend your pure and sincere advice to him, and deal with him from the view point of what you would do for you own self. And avoid deceiving him in any matter of these things. For verily whoever deceives the Muslims, then he is not of them, and indeed he has left off the obligation of being sincere and advising. And this sincerity and advising is absolutely obligatory, however it becomes more emphasized when the person seeks your advice and he requests from you that you give him a beneficial opinion. For this reason the Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) specifically mentioned it in this important situation. The explanation of the hadeeth, “The religion is sincerity”, has already been mentioned previously (in this book) in a manner that suffices without us having to repeat the discussion here.

The Fourth Right:
“And when he sneezes and praises Allaah, then pray for mercy upon him.” This is due to the fact that sneezing is a favor from Allaah, in the expelling of this congested air that is blocked in certain parts of the body of the human being. Allaah makes it easy for this air to have a passage out where it can exit, and thus the sneezing person feels relief. Thus, the Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) legislated that the person praise Allaah for this favor, and he legislated for his (Muslim) brother to say to him, “May Allaah have mercy upon you.” He also commanded the person who sneezed to answer his (Muslim) brother by saying to him, “May Allaah guide you and set right your affairs.” Therefore, whoever does not praise Allaah, then he does not deserve for others to pray for mercy upon him, and in this case he cannot blame anyone except himself. For he is the o­ne who has caused himself to lose the two blessings: the blessing of praising Allaah, and the blessing of his brother’s supplication for him that is a result of the praising.

The Fifth Right:
His statement, “And when he becomes ill, visit him.” Visiting the sick is from the rights of the Muslim, and especially for the person who has a highly stressed and emphasized right upon you, like the relative, and the friend, and so forth. It is from the best of the righteous deeds. And whoever visits his Muslim brother, he remains engulfed in the mercy (of Allaah), and when he sits with him the mercy (of Allaah) covers him. And whoever visits the sick Muslim at the beginning of the day, the Angels send prayers of blessing upon him until evening comes, and whoever visits him at the end of the day, the Angels send prayers of blessing upon him until morning comes. It is desired for the person who visits the sick to supplicate for him to be cured and to make him feel at ease. He should ease his worries by giving him glad tidings of well-being and recovery (i.e. be positive). He should remind him of repentance and turning to Allaah, and he should give him beneficial admonition. He should not sit with him too long (i.e. over staying his welcome), rather he should o­nly sit with him long enough fulfill the right of visiting, unless the sick person is positively effected by many people coming in to see him and many people coming to sit with him. Thus, for each situation there is a different statement (i.e. advice o­n how to deal with it).

The Sixth Right:
His statement, “And if he dies, follow him (his funeral).” For verily whoever follows the funeral until the deceased’s body is prayed over, then he will receive a Qeeraat of reward. (Translator’s note: A Qeeraat is an amount equivalent to the size of the Mountain of Uhud in Madinah.) And if he follows the funeral procession until the body is buried, then he will receive two Qeeraats of reward. And following the funeral procession contains (fulfillment of) a right for Allaah, a right for the deceased, and a right for the living relatives of the deceased.Ash-Shaikh ‘Abdur-Rahmaan bin Naasir As-Sa`dee (Rahimahullaah)

Source: Bahjatu Quloob il-Abraar wa Qurratu ‘Uyoon il-Akhyaar fee Jaami’ il-Akhbaar, pp. 65-67, hadeeth no. 29.

Translated by: Aqeel Walker

Friday Khutbah (19 June 2009): Utilizing our youth effectively

In this Khutbah Imam Zia discussed how to effectively utilise our youth to prepare the future of Ummah.

In the historical context he reminded us of:

  • The Sahaba and how we should follow their footsteps.
  • The youth from the Sahaba
  • The instrumental role the youth played in the Hijrah of the Prophet.
[audio: http://www.archive.org/download/Khutba_utlizing_our_youth/REC040.MP3]

The take away message:

The understanding from this Khutbah is that we also have youth amongst are growing up wasting their time doing what ever they do, watching movies and browsing the internet. Those same energies that they have, they can be harness for the future of Islam. If we use them, utilise them and bring them into use and we harness this energies they can beneficial for Islam. They can be beneficial for future of Islam in this country. But if we let them go then these youths are going wasting their time, and that energy that they could be using for the promotion of Islam. That energy is going to be used for other wasteful activities in committing sins and basically disobeying Allah Subhanahu wa ta’ala.

The main thing is we have to make sure we utilise our youths.

And how to do that:

  • Volunteers in the Mosques
  • Youth with Leadership quality to take lead programme involving the youths.

Once they start taking part and make mosques their second homes, then we?ll find these energies are put into correct use, InshaAllah.

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Friday Khutbah (29 May 2009): Responsibilities in Islam: What are your responsibilities?

In this Friday Khutbah, Brother Hisham Omara (a PhD Student) explains the three types of responsibilities that we have. Asking everyone to ponder upon their own responsibilities and plan how to fulfil these responsibilities.

The three types of responsibilities are:

  1. Responsibility to the creator (Allah)
  2. Responsibility to yourself and family
  3. Responsibility to your community and Ummah
[audio:http://ia301508.us.archive.org/2/items/FridayKhutbah29May2009ResponsibilitiesInIslamWhatAreYour/friday-khuthbah-29-may-2009.mp3]

Alternative formats

The main topic of the Khutbah focused on the understanding your responsibilities in light of Quran and Sunnah.

Brother Hisham asked everyone to ask themselves three questions:

  1. Do you have responsibilities?
  2. What are these responsibilities?
  3. Are you fulfilling these responsibilities?

Brother also asked everyone to ponder on their responsibilities and how to fulfil them. He asks those who have understood their responsibilities and are already carry out their role, to focus on those responsibilities that they are lacking.

As a conclusion (takeaway message) Brother Hisham asked everyone to think of three of their responsibilities and plan to fulfil them from now.

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Mother’s Day – a Historical Overview and the Scholars’ Rulings on this Holiday

As-Salamu `Alaykum,

Today I came across a very good article explaining the Historical Overview of Mother’s Day and the Scholars’ Rulings on this Holiday. This is not a Friday Khtubah but I hope this would help you to come up with your own khutbah, InshaAllah.

wa `Aleykum As-Salaam

Praise be to Allaah and blessings and peace be upon the Messenger of Allaah.

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) told us that his ummah would follow the previous nations, the Jews, Christians and Persians, but this was undoubtedly not praise for their actions, rather it is by way of condemnation and a warning. It was narrated from Abu Sa?eed (may Allaah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ?You will certainly follow the ways of those who came before you, handspan by handspan, cubit by cubit, until even if they entered the hole of a lizard, you will do so too.? We asked, ?O Messenger of Allaah, (do you mean) the Jews and the Christians?? He said, ?Who else?? (Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 3269; Muslim, 2669).

It was narrated from Abu Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ?The Hour will not begin until my ummah follows in the footsteps of those who came before it, handspan by handspan, cubit by cubit.? It was asked, ?O Messenger of Allaah, like the Persians and Romans?? He said, ?Those are the people??

(Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 6888)

The ignorant among this ummah, and the innovators and heretics have followed the previous nations, the Jews, Christians and Persians, in their beliefs, ways, manners and dress. Our concern here is to point out in these days their following and imitation of them through the innovation of ?Mother?s Day? or ?Family Day?, which is a day that the Christians innovated to honour mothers, or so they claim. This then became a day that was venerated, when government departments would be shut and people would get in touch with their mothers or send them gifts and loving messages. But when the day was over, things would go back to the way they were, with people being cut off from their mothers and disobeying them.

What is strange is that the Muslims would feel a need to imitate them in such ways, when Allaah has commanded them to honour their mothers and has forbidden them to disobey them, and has made the reward for that (for obeying them) the highest status.

Continue Reading Mother?s Day ? a Historical Overview and the Scholars? Rulings on this Holiday.

Friday Khutbah (20 February 2009): Domestic Violence in the Muslim Community by Sheikh Hamza Yusuf

This khutbah (sermon) was delivered by Shaykh Hamza Yusuf of the Zaytuna Institute in San Francisco on Friday 20th February as part of the nationwide effort to raise awareness about domestic violence within muslim communities.

As I was browsing around to see how Imam’s addressed the issue in different mosques around the U.S, I found Sheikh Hamza Yousef’s treatment of the matter in his sermon very enlightening, especially for those Muslims and non-Muslims who bring up the Quran in 4:34.

This verse is frequently interpreted as giving women complete control over their own income and property, while obliging men to be responsible for maintaining their female relatives.[1]

A small minority of Muslims interprets the verse as meaning men have an everlasting superiority over women, and thus the authority to beat women with few regulations. This interpretation, however, is neither mainstream nor supported by any prominent Muslim religious leader.[2]

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf basically dispels the myth in a pretty clear manner and addresses the larger moral Islamic issues on this problem.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDEKJDgXO-U[/youtube]

Related: khutbah on domestic violence by Hesham Hassaballah in Chicago the same day (also as part of the nationwide program in US mosques).

References:
[1] Iman Hashim, Reconciling Islam and feminism, Gender & Development, 1999, vol. 7, issue 1, p 7, ISSN 13552074

[2] Ammar, Nawal H. (May 2007). “Wife Battery in Islam: A Comprehensive Understanding of Interpretations”. Violence Against Women 13 (5): 519-523.

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